The future to clean food

GREENHOUSES

I’d like to also point out where this is all headed. Thanks to chemtrails (experimental spraying in the atmosphere), factory waste, the fluoride contamination of irrigation waters and other factors, food grown in the open environment is going to become increasingly contaminated. Also, consider this: The trade winds blow air pollution from China straight to the USA, where much of it gets dumped on U.S. soils. Yes, China exports a portion of its pollution to the United States. This alone is reason enough to demand China clean up its act.

The answer to all this is food grown indoors, in controlled environments. By growing food indoors (in a greenhouse), you largely avoid the fallout from chemtrails, coal-fired power plants and industrial factory pollution.

But it’s crucial that this food be grown with a clean, off-the-grid water source such as a clean well or even rainwater collection (very expensive). Otherwise, if you’re using city water to grow crops, you’re effectively spraying those crops with fluoride, chlorine, and in many cases trace levels of pharmaceuticals and other chemicals that the city water supply doesn’t remove.

Growing food in a greenhouse year-round practically requires that you invest in a greenhouse that can open its roof. Otherwise, crops overheat in the summer months. What this does is reduce the amount of air pollution falling on crops, but it obviously does not eliminate it.

I have investigated this issue in some detail, and a surprisingly affordable solution for retractable roof greenhouses is offered by Cravo Equipment Ltd..

Unfortunately, this company caters mostly to large, commercial-scale growers and not residential greenhouses. But they have installed retractable roof greenhouses that literally cover dozens of acres of crops, including avocados in Texas, Tomatoes in Mexico, and everything else you can think of. Their roofs are made of a fiber, sort of like a commercial-grade showed curtain, allowing them to be easily opened and closed using a system of cables. They aren’t air-tight, however, so in the Northern USA or Canada, a different solution is needed in the winter months.

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